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Michael Norton writes...

Is there any logical reason that Owen did not include a giant iron bell in the castle defenses? I know this would have ruined the drama of the battle. But it is hard to accept the fact that it never occured to any of the defenders during the battle with Oberon.

Greg responds...

I'm not sure that the bell solution is that obvious to Owen. I think it was very clever of Titania to come up with something that generally a fae would have little interest in exploring.

And where would Goliath and Angela found a big iron bell?

Response recorded on March 19, 2000

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Michael Norton writes...

In Walkabout, would Titania have revealed herself and magically intervened if Goliath and Dingo had failed to reason with Matrix?

Greg responds...

What could Titania have done against Matrix?

Response recorded on March 19, 2000

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Aris Katsaris writes...

I started to wonder about the 'Future Tense' episode...

1. What would have happened if Goliath had indeed given Puck the gate? After all he was dreaming the whole thing - would the real-life gate have just disappeared and been taken by Puck or something? Goliath waking up and finding it missing?

2. That thing about Puck not being able to take the gate, he having to be given it - is that again a law of Oberon's or something inherent in the nature of the Gate and/or fae?

3. And if the former, why when in other cases the fae could use just any flimsy excuse to bend Oberon's law, this one was so strictly interpreted that even 'Here you have it, take the gate' wasn't sufficient for Puck to take it?

Greg responds...

1. Goliath would have physically taken the Gate from his pouch, held it out and let go. Puck would appear to take it. All very real. But it didn't happen.

2. It's a law, but I don't know if it's Oberon's law.

3. I'm not sure that their excuses were that flimsy. We always made an effort to bend the laws with a real rationale.

Response recorded on March 19, 2000

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Ambrosia writes...

I was thinking about the Weird Sisters- I know artistic lisence is used all the time with characters, so I was wondering about these Three... In City of Stone, they come off as gentle guiders in Demona's life and remind Goliath of his own ideals... but in Avalon, they are nearly as bad as Demona in their thirst for vengeance. Though not nearly as violent, they make a pact with a sorceror (something they initially swore they wouldn't do) only in order to have revenge against the Magus and the others. This sounds a little contradictory of their characters. What I was wondering is: which is their real personality? Are they more like the Fates of Greek mythology who spin, measure and cut the thread of mortals' lives, or was their power exaggerated by human myth and, in fact, they're only typical, magical beings like Puck or Odin are? I suppose I'm asking how much power they really have...
I also wanted to say how much I love the show and hope that it'll come back some day... in any form. With the maddening popularity of shows like Mutant Turtles, it's refreshing to have an intelligent series like gargoyles to obsess over!

Greg responds...

The Sisters are complex and have many aspects, not all of which have been revealed or conflated yet.

They're not quite as powerful (and/or powerless) as the mythological fates, but they have that aspect.

There was obvioulsy an ulterior motive to their actions in CITY OF STONE. But there may have also been an ulterior motive to their actions in AVALON as well.

Response recorded on March 18, 2000

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Todd Jensen writes...

A fresh effort to do the eight Arthurian survivors correctly.

1. King Arthur
2. Merlin
3. The Lady of the Lake
4. Sir Percival
5. Blanchfleur
6. Morgan le Fay
7. Nimue
8. The Green Knight (the one whom Gawain had that encounter with)

Greg responds...

Eight points.

Thank you. Come again.

No, wait! Eight points. Eight out of eight. FINALLY, A WINNER! And Todd, I have to admit, I'm kinda glad it's you, since you've been the most dedicated to exploring the Arthurian angle here in ASK GREG.

As to the speculation of how they survived, well, I was gonna make another contest out of it, but I realized it would violate my NO IDEAS policy, so...

1. King Arthur Pendragon. Slept under a spell in the Hollow Hill.

2. Merlin. Son of Oberon by a mortal woman. Imprisoned in the Crystal Cave.

3. The Lady of the Lake. One of the Oberati.

4. Sir Percival. The Fisher King. Mr. Duval. Founder of the Illuminati. Spends a lot of time in Castle Carbonek, a sort of mini-traveling-Avalon, where time passes differently. Also uses the Holy Grail to maintain his youth, though at a very real physical cost, due to his, shall we say, sins.

5. Lady Blanchefleur. Percival's wife. Queen of Castle Carbonek. She lives there and uses the Grail. The only cost being her estrangement from Percival.

6. Morgana le Fay. A changling in the old-fashioned sense.

7. Nimue. A sorceress with connections to Merlin, the Oberati and Morgana. (Think about it.)

8. The Green Knight. An Oberati.

Anyway, the above revelations are a gift I'm giving all of you on Todd's behalf. Thank him. Todd, to claim your prize, have Gore or DemonaCrzy forward your e-mail address to me.

Response recorded on March 18, 2000

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Aris Katsaris writes...

<Stares> There's quite a little more than the usual kind of questioning over here, isn't there? More of a discussion. Interesting... But rather than the 'shake up' commentary most are talking about, let me add my opinion on something different that was mentioned by Todd -- namely about Oberon (a fay) ruling over gods such as Odin.

On the whole I'd say that I have no problem with it - on the other hand I would have a bit of a problem if a god from a specific pantheon were to rule over all others - it might almost seem to imply that the specific pantheon and culture was more important than that of others. (I'd find it far more difficult to accept a universe where Zeus was superior to Odin for example...) Oberon and Titania from their beginnings in Shakespeare seemed more universal characters than any single mythological one; they were characters seemingly from Britain (Robin Goodfellow for example...) passing through Greece and discussing about events of India...

Greg responds...

I agree. It was one of the reasons that I made Oberon & Titania's skin Blue and Green. I didn't want to imply that white "godlings" ruled the others.

Response recorded on March 17, 2000

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Vashkoda writes...

Hi Greg! Ditto what Jenna just said. I'm going to try to insert a question in here, tho'. Did the third race create Avalon, or did Avalon create the third race? If this question is hard to answer, could you tell me which appeared first? Thanks!

Greg responds...

It's not quite that cut and dry... One didn't create the other.

Response recorded on March 17, 2000

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Todd Jensen writes...

One thing that I'm going to confess here, and it's that I'm still feeling somewhat taken aback at the discovery that the mythological gods in the Gargoyles Universe are subject to Oberon, a "mere" faerie king (though don't tell him that I called him that :) In traditional legend, Oberon wasn't a divinity, so seeing him have authority over gods like Odin feels a little strange to me still. It's like seeing an earl giving orders to a king. I know that in the Gargoyles Universe, Oberon does outrank the gods of mythology and that they were really "just" powerful faerie-folk, but it does feel a little odd to me all the same.

Greg responds...

That is... an absolutely SHOCKING confession.

Or not.

Look, I knew it was going to be controversial (relatively speaking). Frank Paur wasn't particularly comfortable with the idea, but I'm a fast talker.

The main motivation was that I wanted the Garg Universe to have a certain cohesion. I wanted it to be rich and expansive, but not completely arbitrary. So after a bit of tease and mystery, we reveal a feudal system.

And Oberon's lack of shall we say, press, didn't bother me. He was the big man behind the scenes. And although he's not exactly Mr. Maturity, I don't think that bothered him.

And of course, he did have at least one spectacular press agent. Guy named Will.

Response recorded on March 17, 2000

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Jackal's Love writes...

In Grief, the Emir used a spell (the Scroll of Thoth) to become the Avatar (eventually). Since Anubis is a Child of Oberon, are there any spells out there that could turn someone into an avatar for Oberon, Puck, Titania, or any of the other Children? Or, is it possible for someone to force one of the Children to do what Anubis did?
Thanks for your time.

Greg responds...

Sure, it's possible.

Response recorded on March 17, 2000

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Ambrosia writes...

Hi, Greg!
I was wondering what Oberon did with himself during the thousand-year-long banishment? He obviously wasn't on Avalon because that's where Katherine, Tom, Magus and the eggs were... but he also seemed *completely* naive of the modern world- like when Xanatos or Elisa pulled their respective guns on him- he acted like he'd never seen such things before. Not to mention his comment in The Gathering, "Interesting what these mortals can acheive with their 'science'."

Greg responds...

I think there's a big difference between his reaction to Elisa's gun and Xanatos'. With Elisa, he was reacting to the iron content in the weapon. With Xanatos, he was curious about its futuristic look and nature.

Likewise, I don't think Oberon had had much exposure to force fields. Have you?

I think Oberon was out and about all those years. He knew the modern world. But not everything about it.

Response recorded on March 13, 2000


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