A Station Eight Fan Web Site

Gargoyles

The Phoenix Gate

Ask Greg Archives

Pendragon

Archive Index


: « First : « 10 : Displaying #101 - #110 of 343 records. : 10 » : 100 » : Last » :


Posts Per Page: 1 : 10 : 25 : 50 : 100 : All :


Bookmark Link

KW Keller writes...

Well, I'm not Todd, but in response to the history of Excalibur, Geoffrey of Monmouth's "Caliburn" is thought by some to be derived from the Welsh "Caledfwlch" (Breton "Kaledvoulc'h"), or from the Irish "Caladbolg" or "Caladcholg." Caledfwlch appears in several Welsh Arthurian stories, especially "Culhwch ac Olwen." Caladbolg, "hard dinter," was the lightning sword of Fergus Mac Roth. Caladcholg was a similar sword owned by Fergus Mac Leti. Various people have argued at one time or another that the modern idea of Excalibur was taken from one of these sources.

Greg responds...

Interesting.

Response recorded on September 06, 2001

Bookmark Link

Anonymous writes...

Who are Morgana's parents?
How can she beat Merlin? I mean Merlin is the son of Oberon who is one of the most powerful fay. Does that mean she also has a unique parentage like Merlin?

Greg responds...

Who said she 'beat' him and what does that even mean?

Response recorded on September 06, 2001

Bookmark Link

Anonymous writes...

What class of fay is Lady of the Lake? Power class?

Greg responds...

This ain't an R-P game, my friend.

Response recorded on September 06, 2001

Bookmark Link

Anonymous writes...

Does the Lady of the Lake have any biological children? Have you mentioned the name of any of her children on Askgreg?

Greg responds...

YOu are now officially making me sleepy.

Response recorded on September 06, 2001

Bookmark Link

Entity writes...

Hi Greg,

Don't let the death of Team Atlantis get you down, true brilliance is never recognized in its own time.

Anyway, I was wondering about your personal opinion on something: pop Arthurian Legend. First there was the "Merlin" miniseries, now there's another one on TNT called "The Mists of Avalon." Both take the traditional story of King Arthur and try to present its elements of magic to contemporary TV audiences in the guise of religion. Instead of accepting magic as a part of the legend, which I guess TV execs think is too "silly" or maybe even "controversial," they turn the Arthur legend into a morality tale about the old verse the new, Paganism verse Christianity, imagination verse logic, etc... take your pick.

What's your take? Do you think this is a constructive and innovative approach to telling the story, or a distracting and childish one?

Greg responds...

Well, I haven't seen Mists and have only seen pieces of Merlin. So I can't judge either series.

I think you tip your hand on your opinion, however.

In and of itself, the approach has some potential. It's about execution. And the ideas aren't mutually exclusive. Look at EXCALIBUR (the movie). It has elements of both approaches, and I think it's wonderful. (Just saw it again recently. It really holds up.)

Response recorded on September 06, 2001

Bookmark Link

Todd Jensen writes...

One question which I'll confess I've occasionally found myself asking about Arthur's quest for Merlin. Why does Arthur feel that he really needs Merlin by his side again? After all, in the traditional legends, he spent the majority of his reign without Merlin being there (Merlin's departure in the "Arthurian canon" took place almost directly after Arthur married Guinevere and set up the knights of the Round Table), and fared well enough on his own (not to mention that I don't think that Merlin could have seriously prevented the fall of Camelot even if he had been there, seeing that it was brought about through the one thing that his magic could not overcome, the human heart, as Macbeth pointed out in "A Lighthouse in the Sea of Time"). Furthermore, at least some versions of the legend (including T. H. White and Roger Lancelyn Green) indicate that part of the reason why Merlin left Arthur's court (ultimately to wind up in the Crystal Cave) was because Arthur needed to stand on his own rather than constantly leaning on the wizard for help.

So why does Arthur feel that he still needs Merlin's help? (Admittedly, he does seem in a rather vulnerable situation at present, given that he's now in a world that's unfamiliar to him and very different from 6th century Britain - and he hasn't had the advantage that Macbeth had of being able to watch it change gradually and adjust accordingly - it's all been thrown upon him at once, just the way that it was on Goliath and his clan).

Greg responds...

Well, start with this. Merlin's a friend.

Do you really need any other reason?

Some of the other stuff you mentioned is good too.

Response recorded on September 06, 2001

Bookmark Link

Todd Jensen writes...

Do you imagine New Camelot being anything like the Savage Land in Marvel Comics (though taking its "echoes of the past" element from the mythical Arthurian Age of Chivalry than from the Mesozoic, obviously)?

Greg responds...

New Camelot? No.

Response recorded on September 03, 2001

Bookmark Link

zakhur writes...

I've been hearing a lot of someone called Nimue, who is she? sorry if this question been asked, but I haven't seen it in the archives

Greg responds...

Then you haven't looked in the Pendragon section.

Or read much of anything on the legends of King Arthur.

Nimue comes directly from that mythology.

Response recorded on September 01, 2001

Bookmark Link

Todd Jensen writes...

Have you ever read "Camelot 3000"?

Greg responds...

Yes. In fact, I worked at DC Comics when/while it was being produced (over I believe a two year or more period).

Response recorded on August 15, 2001

Bookmark Link

Todd Jensen writes...

You've mentioned before that one of your favorite Arthurian works, and one which you've used quite a bit as a "primary source" (it clearly was at least a major influence for your handling of Percival and Blanchefleur) was Roger Lancelyn Green's "King Arthur". Have you ever read any of R. L. Green's other rehandlings of myths and legends (he wrote one on Greek mythology, "Heroes of Greece and Troy", one on Norse mythology, "Myths of the Norsemen", and one on Robin Hood)?

Greg responds...

I have FOUND a copy of Green's Greek Myth book, but haven't had the time to read it yet. Haven't found the other two you mentioned. Some day.

Response recorded on August 15, 2001


: « First : « 10 : Displaying #101 - #110 of 343 records. : 10 » : 100 » : Last » :