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KirK writes...

2 - In the gargoyle version of macbeth retold via City of Stone flashbacks, why is it that the character of hecate seen in the original play was never featured?

Greg responds...

What role would she have played?

Response recorded on May 01, 2007

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Todd Jensen writes...

I was hesitant about making this comment for a while, since I was afraid that it might be read as an idea. But I finally decided (especially since it only uses information directly from "A Lighthouse in the Sea of Time") that it was probably safe.

You mentioned in your ramble on "A Lighthouse in the Sea of Time" that the significance of the inscription on the chest containing Merlin's Scrolls, "The seeker of knowledge has nothing to fear; the destroyer everything" was that the chest was magically warded so that anybody intending to destroy the Scrolls in the manner of Hakon burning pages from the Grimorium Arcanorum would apparently have met an unpleasant fate (and that it was a good thing for Morwood-Smythe and Duane that they were seekers of knowledge). But I found myself seeing another significance to those words beside that.

Macbeth's purpose in stealing the Scrolls was to use the magic that he believed was in them for his own purposes, apparently as part of his hunt for Demona. Goliath clearly feared that others would be after Merlin's magic for the same reason (such as Xanatos - and indeed, we've seen at least two other magic-workers in the series who would have no doubt been eager to exploit the spells that Merlin's Scrolls were thought to contain for their own dark ends). I believe that you could term anyone seeking to put the Scrolls to such use a "destroyer".

But it turns out that the Scrolls are of no value to a "destroyer" in that sense, but only to the "seeker of knowledge" - for what they contain is not Merlin's spells but his memoirs about his life and his tutoring the young King Arthur. Such information seemed useless to Macbeth, but a "seeker of knowledge" would indeed have found them invaluable - an eye-witness account of King Arthur's times, written by Merlin himself! So indeed, in a different sense than you mentioned in the ramble, the search for the Scrolls of Merlin would only be rewarding to the "seeker of knowledge" and not to the "destroyer".

Greg responds...

I like that analysis... and it fits in with plans I have. Stay tuned...

Response recorded on April 19, 2007

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Elana writes...

Dear Greg,

Here is a question I've been meaning to ask you for a long time.

Demona and Macbeth's link implies that they will basically live eternally until one kills the other. However, I wonder - does that not mean that they can still be maimed, crippled, or permanently physically disabled? Mentally damaged? They seem to have survived things that should have been fatal, and because of the enchantment it is acceptable that they survive. But why not even sustain serious injury? On top of surviving, will their bodies always be restored to a state of full health?

Additionally, gotta say that I'm loving the comic book! I'm not going to say a lot about it here, because I'm sending a letter through the snail mail, but just gotta let you know that it's good to be back in the Gargoyles' universe!

Greg responds...

Thanks. It's good to be back for me too.

I've answered your question MANY times before. Which is to say, I can't answer it. They've never been maimed, etc. So how would I know?

Response recorded on April 09, 2007

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Makhasu writes...

Why did Macbeth allow Banquo and Fleance to fight (and possibly kill, since he surely knew their attitudes towards gargoyles) Goliath's clan members right after Goliath and co. saved his life? You've always seemed baffled that some people considered Pendragon to be an out-of-character episode for Macbeth. I've never understood that. He's just plain spiteful towards Arthur, seems on pretty bitter terms with Goliath's clan (he even refers to them as "my enemies," etc...

Greg responds...

Well, let's just agree to disagree.

Response recorded on March 09, 2007

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Makhasu writes...

Is Macbeth still wealthy by 2198?

Is Demona still wealthy by 2198?

Greg responds...

I'm not revealing this information at this time.

Response recorded on March 09, 2007

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Makhasu writes...

Does being aged physically from 35 to 52 have much of an effect on Macbeth? He seems to be in incredible shape for his physical age, much better than that of someone younger.

Greg responds...

He's in great shape. 52 is the new 42, I'm told.

Response recorded on March 08, 2007

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Makhasu writes...

Who does Demona hate most: Goliath, Macbeth, or Elisa?

Greg responds...

I feel like I've answered this already. But even if I haven't... Why quantify something unquantifiable.

But if I had to guess, I'd say Elisa.

Response recorded on March 07, 2007

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Makhasu writes...

In COS part four, Luna tells Macbeth "And thus you both shall live, eternally linked, sharing each others pain and anguish. With no release until one destroys the other. Only then shall both finally perish, together. What she making a prophesy of what would occur, or was she just stating the rules of their link?

Greg responds...

Good question.

Response recorded on March 07, 2007

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Makhasu writes...

You said on the COS dvd commentary, when Demona swings Macbeth around, "I think she's just a little bit in love with him there." While I don't think it was an strong romantic love, I do think she was much more affectionate towards him than she would have been to someone else. We never see her that friendly towards anyone else she's not romantically involved with, not even her own clan members. My question is, was she aware of it? Was he? Was Gruoch? >=)

Greg responds...

No. Not really. No comment.

Response recorded on March 07, 2007

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Makhasu writes...

Why hadn't Macbeth and Gruoch gotten married by 1032? They were 27 years old by the time she was betrothed to Gillecomgain. Why didn't they marry before that?

Greg responds...

He had NO prospects. And Duncan probably wouldn't give permission (as both were of the royal blood). The fact that both were still unmarried to anyone else at the advanced age of 27, I think is an indication of how much they were in love.

Response recorded on March 07, 2007

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Makhasu writes...

Was Macbeth genuinely in love (not just smitten) with Dominique? I only ask this because he had known her for such a short time, and even then knew very little about her.

Greg responds...

I believe I'll let the story stand on its own without my commentary. You can evaluate for yourself.

Response recorded on March 06, 2007

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Makhasu writes...

Someone asked if Macbeth had ever been married to anyone other than Gruoch and Dominique, and you said "Maybe, but not often." Why not? Why didn't he get married more often?

Greg responds...

It's painful to survive one's loved ones. It takes powerful incentives to overcome the natural resistance to get that close to someone.

Response recorded on March 06, 2007

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Makhasu writes...

You've said that Macbeth sometimes works as a stage actor. In what sort of productions? How well does he get along with taking orders from the directors? =)

Greg responds...

He's done some Shakespeare, certainly. Probably other stuff as well. Maybe some Stoppard or Shaw. I could definitely see him doing some Shaw.

And I'm sure he got along just fine with the directors. He's not a prima dona or anything.

Response recorded on March 06, 2007

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Makhasu writes...

What was Macbeth's relationship with Gillecomgain like after Gillecomgain became the High Steward of Moray?

Greg responds...

Not good.

Response recorded on March 05, 2007

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Makhasu writes...

What was Macbeth's relationship with Bodhe like after he became King in 1040? By 1057, neither he nor Luach seemed particularly fond of him.

Greg responds...

I think they were FOND of him, actually. Doesn't mean they agreed with him much.

Response recorded on March 05, 2007

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Makhasu writes...

How was Demona able to get Macbeth to marry her in such a short time? He only knew 'Dominique' for less than a month, according to the dates you've given.

Greg responds...

How do YOU think?

Response recorded on March 01, 2007

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Makhasu writes...

You said that, besides pain, pleasure also passes between Macbeth and Demona. Why would the Weird Sisters toss that in? Doesn't it creep Mac and D out a bit?

For that matter, when did they first find out about that? It must've been a pretty shocking experience.

Greg responds...

Your premise is faulty. You make it sound like the Weird Sisters made a choice. No one has definitively stated that. They made a link.

As to Mac & D's reaction, etc., I'm not revealing that now.

Response recorded on March 01, 2007

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Makhasu writes...

Did any of the historical events of Macbeth's reign also occur in the Gargoyles universe? For instance, his war with Duncan's father, Crinan, his pilgrimage to Rome, etc...

Greg responds...

Yes. All or nearly all.

Response recorded on March 01, 2007

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Makhasu writes...

Why did Macbeth have Banquo and Fleance as best man and maid of honor at his wedding? He doesn't seem to like them, and the feeling seems to be mutual. So why did he bring them all the way to Paris for his wedding?

Greg responds...

They were his employees. They didn't come for the wedding. They came to serve his needs, whatever his needs might be.

Response recorded on February 28, 2007

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Makhasu writes...

Why did Macbeth want the Scrolls of Merlin? That was never answered in the episode Lighthouse in a Sea of Time.

Greg responds...

Yes, it was, actually. He thought they'd contain powerful magical spells... useful (potentially) in his conflict with/hunt for Demona.

Response recorded on February 28, 2007

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Makhasu writes...

What was the relationship between Macbeth and Duncan like during the eight years that Duncan was king? By 1040, he seemed to trust Macbeth enough to go walking with him and his son.

Greg responds...

Barely.

Macbeth tried to demonstrate his loyalty. Duncan always regarded these attempts with suspicion.

Response recorded on February 28, 2007

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Makhasu writes...

You answered, when asked if Macbeth and Demona share emotional pain, "Metaphorically." I didn't quite understand that. Could you explain in greater detail?

Greg responds...

Probably.

Response recorded on February 27, 2007

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Makhasu writes...

Where did Macbeth go when he fled Scotland in 1057? Did he ever return?

Greg responds...

I'm not answering the former at this time. But, yes, he has been back to Scotland since 1057.

Response recorded on February 27, 2007

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Makhasu writes...

Did Macbeth really die when Canmore stabbed him? The Weird Sisters said to Demona that "though the pain is great, child, you are unharmed." Were she and Macbeth alive, but in pain, when Canmore declared himself victorious?

Greg responds...

Six of one, half dozen of the other.

Response recorded on February 27, 2007

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Makhasu writes...

Can Demona or Macbeth sustain permanent damage? Like scars, lost limbs, etc... They're in impeccable shape for people who've been, as you said in one answer, "stabbed, shot, etc."

Greg responds...

The question isn't can they, but HAVE they.

Response recorded on February 27, 2007


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